Son of the Whale God - A Work in Progress

cartograp:

Matt Kish spent a year and a half obsessively illustrating one page a day of Herman Melville’s 552 page classic, Moby-Dick. Finally finished, a version of the book featuring his work, Moby-DIck in Pictures: One Drawing for Every Page, is set to be published on the 11th.

Clicky here for his blog featuring every one of his 552 illustrations.

This comes out tomorrow! If you haven’t gotten me a birthday present yet, Tumblr, you know where to look.

livielightyear:

aforeignocean:

First of the VMFA (Virginia Museum of Fine Art) posts.  This is a massive (look at the human comparison) whale titled “Mocha Dick” after the whale that inspired Moby Dick.  The artist Tristin Lowe did an incredible job making this out of white industrial felt.  They placed a piece of the material on the wall so you could feel it, and I thought that was a great move.

Can you even imagine…? Wow.

Is this to scale? Even if it isn’t, ho. ly. God. Can you imagine being in a cedar boat while this thing comes rising up from the depths beneath you? That’s like being in a boat made of matchsticks. As terrible as whaling was for the whale population/probably the entire ocean ecosystem, think about the kind of human courage/idiocy it takes to do something like that. Whalers were the closest approximate I think we’ll ever have to knights facing dragons, armed only with a flimsy sword/harpoon.

danceabletragedy:

MobyDickCake

hey

my birthday is October 17th

JUST

SAYIN

satchmo88:

moby dick

This is probably about the size of the Whale God. It’s hard to describe something that’s really god damn large in an era before contemporary skyscrapers. What it comes down to, really, is describing how small people are in comparison to it. Can you imagine a world where the largest things weren’t manmade? (Besides like mountains and volcanoes, those don’t count.) HISTORY MAN, IT’S CRAZY

satchmo88:

moby dick

This is probably about the size of the Whale God. It’s hard to describe something that’s really god damn large in an era before contemporary skyscrapers. What it comes down to, really, is describing how small people are in comparison to it. Can you imagine a world where the largest things weren’t manmade? (Besides like mountains and volcanoes, those don’t count.) HISTORY MAN, IT’S CRAZY